Keith Locke

Keith Locke is a social justice activist and past Green Party New Zealand Member of Parliament.

Keith Locke has written prolifically on social and human rights issues since he entered parliament in 2011. His blog posts and articles, opinion pieces, submissions and presentations have appeared in multiple blogs, newspapers and other other outlets. The majority are republished here and can be found via the feed, links and search function available on this page.

Latest Article

What’s missing from the report into the Christchurch terrorist attack

This article was published by Spinoff on 22 December 2020 By Keith Locke The weakness of the royal commission report is that it treats Islamist extremist terrorism and extreme right white nationalist terrorism as different categories, when in fact they are part of the same problem, argues former Green MP Keith Locke.Much of the commentary on the royal commission report into the Christchurch terrorist attacks falls short in one important way. It doesn’t really explain why such forms of terrorism exist today, and how the white nationalist terrorism we saw in Christchurch interacts with extreme Islamist terrorism.Earlier terrorism, in the late 20th century, was largely secular. In Western countries, a small section of the radicalising youth movement became impatient with the pace of change and resorted to targeted bombing and kidnapping – through groups like the Weather Underground, the Red Brigades and Baader-Meinhof. Pro-Palestinian terrorism was also mainly secular, aimed at...

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ABOUT KEITH

Keith Locke is a former Green Party Member of Parliament, serving from 1999 to 2011. He is best known for his human rights and antiwar work not only through the Foreign Affairs portfolio he held through this period, but also under his other portfolios which included Human Rights, Immigration, Police, Ethnic Affairs and Defence. Keith has been an international peace and social justice campaigner since first anti-nuclear, anti-Vietnam war and anti-apartheid protests of the 1960s.