Keith Locke: Parliament’s watchdog committee has no teeth

[An opinion piece published in the New Zealand Herald, 10 March 2017] Parliament’s intelligence and security committee was in the news recently when Labour’s Andrew Little nominated Winston Peters for membership. Little also proposed expanding the committee to include a Green member by amending the Intelligence and Security Bill currently before Parliament. In practice, theContinue reading Keith Locke: Parliament’s watchdog committee has no teeth

Answers to some common myths about New Zealand’s intelligence services, the Five Eyes and the Waihopai spy station

Presented as introductory comments at a workshop hosted by the Anti-Bases Campaign in Blenheim, 28 Jan 2017, and updated to reflect changes made to intelligence legislation in the Intelligence and Security Act 2017. By Keith Locke Were the SIS and GSB set up to detect terrorists? The Security Intelligence Service (SIS), and the Police SpecialContinue reading Answers to some common myths about New Zealand’s intelligence services, the Five Eyes and the Waihopai spy station

Submission on the NZ Intelligence and Security Bill

[Submission by Keith Locke to Parliament’s Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Select Committee, 3 October 2016] Main Point The NZ Intelligence and Security Bill unnecessarily allows for greater surveillance of New Zealanders by our intelligence services and intrudes further on our privacy. The definition of national security is so broad that it could enable evenContinue reading Submission on the NZ Intelligence and Security Bill

Keith Locke: Hard to spy gains from Five Eyes

[This article of mine was published in the New Zealand Herald on 15 March 2016.  It was in response to the report of Intelligence and Security Agencies Review, released on 9 March.] The intelligence services report by Sir Michael Cullen and Dame Patsy Reddy sheds more light on the GCSB’s work with the Five EyesContinue reading Keith Locke: Hard to spy gains from Five Eyes

Submission to the Intelligence and Security Agencies Review 2015

Submitted by Keith Locke on 13 August 2015 to the official review being conducted by Sir Michael Cullen and Dame Patsy Reddy In this submission I will address the following Term of Reference in the Review. Point 1. The legislative frameworks of the intelligence and security agencies Point 2. The oversight of the SIS andContinue reading Submission to the Intelligence and Security Agencies Review 2015

No public accountability for the GCSB

[This was published on Evening Report on 9 March 2015.  http://eveningreport.nz/2015/03/09/keith-locke-no-public-accountability-for-the-gcsb/] By Keith Locke “YOU SHOULDN’T WORRY IF YOU’VE GOT NOTHING TO HIDE” is one of the mantras trotted out when New Zealanders complain about the GCSB having access to their private communications. Let’s turn that mantra around as ask those running the GCSB whyContinue reading No public accountability for the GCSB

More than reassuring words needed to get to the truth on spying

My opinion piece (below) was published in the 5 December 2013 issue of the New Zealand Herald. Read this article on the NZ Herald website In his Dialogue page piece this week, Paul Buchanan calls on our Government “to prepare contingency plans for the diplomatic fallout that inevitably lies ahead” when information from Edward Snowden’sContinue reading More than reassuring words needed to get to the truth on spying

Separate spy agency not needed

Today (31 August) the New Zealand Herald published my opinion piece critical of the GCSB, under the heading “Separate Spy Agency Not Needed” with a subhead: “Instead of spending $60m a year on a GCSB the cyber-security side could easily be transferred to the police.” The OpEd also questions the benefit of an agency whoseContinue reading Separate spy agency not needed

My submission to the Intelligence and Security Committee on the GCSB Bill

On 3 July I travelled to Parliament to speak to the Intelligence and Security Committee to explain my written submission on the GCSB Bill (see below for the text). Quite a lot of people and journalists were present, although I must admit that Kim Dotcom (who spoke to the committee an hour after me) was theContinue reading My submission to the Intelligence and Security Committee on the GCSB Bill